3 Fumba Kitchen Bestseller Recipes

Some like it hot, some African traditional, others with a touch of Asia. These three recipes are the bestsellers in Fumba Town’s first kiosk restaurant which has been serving the community since 2018.

Paulina Mayala, 28, born and raised in Zanzibar, is executive chef of the popular Kwetu Kwenu – Swahili for “my place is your place” -  in Fumba Town (meanwhile, read more about the new Kwetu Kwenu Chill on the following page). She started her journey in Fumba three and a half years ago with a lot of enthusiasm and passion for cooking – and without any culinary studies.  “The owners of Kwetu Kwenu, Franko and Bernadette, helped me a lot”, Paulina says. “They have a beautiful way to empower people and to see potential and talent, and give people a chance to take their lives to another level.” Paulina’s best selling dishes at Kwetu Kwenu are Thai cashew chicken, Juicy Lucy beef burger and the famous Kwetu Kwenu brownies – cosmopolitan country kitchen made in Fumba.

Thai Cashew chicken

Chicken breast, onions, garlic, ginger, carrot, red and yellow pepper, zucchini (or any other fresh veggies)

What makes this recipe outstanding, is the way Paulina prepares the chicken, tossing the pieces of chicken breast in some flour and baking powder. Then she deep-fries the pieces of chicken in hot oil. The same procedure of deep-frying applies to the cashew pieces, until they become golden brown. Saute the veggies, starting with some onion, garlic and ginger, and add pieces of carrot, red and yellow pepper and zucchini, until they become golden brown. Then Paulina adds some special homemade Thai sauce to mix with all the ingredients to give the special Asian flavour.

Juicy Lucy beef burger

1kg of minced meat, 6 egg yolk, margarine 200g (frozen), bread crumbs 300g, Onions 2 (chopped), Carrot 1 (chopped), salt and pepper, garlic, 6 burger buns from Eat Zanzibar

Depending how “meaty” you want your burger, add more carrots, says Paulina. Some chefs use the whole egg, but she prefers to add only the yolk. Mix all well, form “flatties'' or more rounded burgers and keep in the fridge for at least half an hour before frying. Simple but cosmopolitan: Island treats by Kwetu Kwenu

Kwetu Kwetu Brownies

Sugar 300g, flour 75g, Cocoa 75, butter 225g, dark chocolate 225g, Egg 4 pcs fully

Stir and knead everything for 3 minutes, fill in forms and bake for 30 minutes at 180 degrees. Tastes fumbalicious for breakfast, afternoon tea or at parties, success guaranteed.

All roads leading to Fumba

Fumba Town is getting two top-notch public roads and public water access, all to be completed this year.

Finally, two brand new tarmac roads will connect Fumba Town to the rest of the world. The roadwork is in the making and expected to be completed within weeks latest by November according to the contractor. The government has contracted Turkish company IRIS ASER in a joint venture to develop a network of feeder roads all over the island with a total of about 275 kilometres.


The road from Dimani market to the Fumba Town gate (1.3 km) and further up to the waterfront (500 metres) is part of the package, as well as a road from Nyamanzi to Kombeni (1 km), explained Taner Baskiran of the Turklsh contractor.


Residents of both villages and Fumba Town dwellers are eagerly following progress.Meanwhile, the Zanzibar Minister of Water, Energy and Minerals, Shaib H. Kaduara, visited Fumba Town alongside an on-going water extension on the Fumba peninsula. Public water pipes are currently being installed. So far, the new suburb Fumba Town has been relying entirely on its own wells and water supply. Fresh water is expected to become less costly once the public system is installed. Tobias Dietzold, chief of product of Fumba Town developer CPS, hosted the Minister and took him around the new town. “We had a fruitful discussion about the connectivity”, said Dietzold. Minister Kaduara ensured a “reliable infrastructure”. Fumba Town is one of the most significant inv

Going Nuts About Cashews

Fahad Awadh succeeds with first modern cashew factory in Zanzibar

By staff writer

Ever wondered why Tanzania is among the biggest cashews growers in the world but rarely exports the finished product? Here comes the answer – and the change.

First we get lost looking for mighty Fahad Awadh and his new cashew factory near Amaan stadium. It’s situated in an ageing Industrial Park of the same name, opened in 1976, just minutes from the stadium but the fact that there is no signboard and not really a highway to reach it, already says it all. Business attitudes yet have a long way to go on the tropical island of Zanzibar.

Not with Fahad Awadh, though. Having grown up as an especially talented kid in Toronto, Canada, to where his Zanzibari parents migrated when he was young, he returned to his home island ten years ago with a clear focus: “To work as an entrepreneur, to develop an industry.” Now 36 years old, he masterminded, built up and opened a top-notch modern cashew factory in the Amaan business park, being one of the first entrepreneurs to revive the hub which had been lying idle for the best of two decades. Other are following, like a glass-fibre boat company, and Awadh just opened a neat staff canteen, too, open-air and surrounded by colourful cashew graffiti. 

Why Zanzibar? Why cashews? Sitting in his minimalist office, dressed all in black, Awadh answers with a big smile and a deep baritone voice: “We produce a lot of things in Africa, cotton, tobacco, coffee, but rarely we add value.” So, the man who won several ‘talent kid” competitions in Canada and was admitted early to a special school program for whizz kids, started his research looking for the best possible Tanzanian product to market – and landed with the cashews. He chose Zanzibar because of its port, cargo ferry and welcome government incentives such as three-year free rent and duty-free import. With such assistance the Zanzibar Investment Promotion Authority (ZIPA) aims to revive Amaan park.

“94 percent of Tanzania’s cashews are exported in a raw state to countries such as Vietnam and India, where they are processed, roasted and shipped onward to Europe and the US”, Awadh explains a ludicrous process, “so there is huge potential for exporting the finished product directly from here to the consuming country.” He sources his cashews from small-scale farmers in the Mtwara region, considered some of the best in the country. The farmers do the shelling, earning more with that. Drying, peeling, roasting and flavouring is carried out in the state-of-the art block-chain factory with aluminium machinery and gadgets, all fully automated. “The hardest part was getting the finance to buy the machinery”, says Awadh, whose father partners with him in the business. 

Cashew nuts, we learn, aren’t actually nuts at all, but the seed of the cashew apple, resembling a yellow pepper. veggie. They are rich in protein and essential minerals. Shipping them around the world unprocessed, however, is an environmental nuisance because they are bulky; a seed-to-shop model much more sustainable. 

By hand, not-so-perfect nuts are eliminated from the crop and moisture checks undertaken. Already, Awadh is employing more than 35 skilled workers, men and women. The factory began processing in 2019. By now, the production stands at 100-120 tons of cashews per year, packaged in 150gr bags, at a wholesale price of TZS 5,000 (about two dollars). A special QR code on the vacuum bag tells the consumer which farm the cashew is coming from  – a transparency highly appreciated in the West. Other products such as cashew butter are being added. And there is room for expansion: ”We now produce three to four times a week”, Awadh says, “we could even go 24/7”.

Hello, Silicon Zanzibar!

Government acts to bring tech firms here - major breakthrough for Zanzibar.

What do dukas (Swahili for shops) and the African tech revolution have in common? A lot, if you ask the Zanzibar government and Wasoko, the continent’s fastest growing company, which has just moved its base to Fumba Town.

The Zanzibar government is set to make the tropical island of white beaches, tourism and ancient culture a centre of tech in Africa by starting an initiative ‘Silicon Zanzibar’ with wide-ranging incentives. The first tech giant, Wasoko, initially from Kenya, has already arrived here. Other tech companies from across Africa are to follow. The physical base of the new digital world is Fumba Town, the modern seaside community just southwest of Zanzibar City.

Suddenly there were colourful pillows placed on an office veranda, beanbags in a meeting lobby. Vibes and looks changed drastically in recent weeks in Fumba Town, the flagship development of German engineering firm CPS, which is constructing thousands of shining white residential and commercial units along a 1.5 kilometre stretch of seashore close to the airport. Overnight, Wasoko – a tech firm focussing on changing duka trade and essential goods deliveries in Africa   – had rented dozens of houses and apartments here and relocated 40 elite young team members including its CEO to the island. Penina Agure, 25, a tech supporter from Kisumu, Kenya said about her new working environment: “All is at arm’s-length; the houses are really nice and not too complex.”

Right time, right place

The surprise initiative for Zanzibar – which for now gets 80 per cent of its foreign exchange earnings through tourism - was to be officially launched at a VIP-studded inaugural event in Fumba Town on August 30 in the presence of Zanzibar’s president Dr. Hussein Ali Mwinyi and other dignitaries. Zanzibar Minister of Labour, Economy and Investment, Mudrik R. Soraga, explained: “No longer will tech companies need to open offices and move their people to Dubai or London to manage operations in Africa.” 

‚Silicon Zanzibar’ will streamline the issuance of work visas to skilled tech workers from across Africa and beyond, it was announced. Also under debate are tax incentives to participating companies. In return Wasoko, for example, has offered to help develop IT curricula for Zanzibar university and train interns. “Silicon Valley was successful, because it invited the best and brightest from all over the world”, says Daniel Yu, the founder and CEO of Wasoko, “tech knows no borders.” According to experts, tech companies in Africa received over six billion dollars in financing in 2021, making it the continent’s fastest growing major industry.

No walls, no fences – that’s Fumba

“The start-up atmosphere of Fumba Town and new tech companies like Wasoko perfectly inspire each other”, noted Fumba town chief developers Sebastian and Tobias Dietzold. “CPS supports developing vibrant communities that add value for investors, such as Wasoko, with a core purpose of empowering the Zanzibar people and businesses.” 

Coincidentally, both ventures – Fumba Town and Wasoko - were started in 2015. The African town built on eco principles with waste recycling and permaculture gardens will eventually house around 20,000 residents. It is the first project in Zanzibar where foreigners are free to buy. Wasoko, meaning “market people” in Swahili, is valued at $625 million after receiving over 145 million dollars of equity financing. According to the Financial Times it is Africa’s fastest growing company, now operating in seven countries and 30 cities. “We had been looking for a location where we can bring together the best talent from across the continent in a creative hub”, said Daniel Yu. “We chose Fumba Town and Zanzibar because it is a globally attractive destination, a facilitating environment and we found the Zanzibar government very supportive. No walls, no fences, no compounds, to us Fumba is like a campus”, he added: “We are honoured to be a founding partner for Silicon Zanzibar, and expect Wasoko to be the first of many tech companies to establish a presence on the island.” 

How does Wasoko work?

Dukas, as trillions of informal, kiosk-like shops all over the continent are called in Swahili, are at the heart of operations of Wasoko. Collectively they sell an incredible $600 billion of goods every year. Just like Amazon, Wasoko is an e-commerce platform - except that it is not selling and delivering to individual customers but to shops. One duka serves about hundred people, is the equation. With Wasoko they can place orders through SMS or mobile app, receive free same-day delivery and, importantly, pay-later-financing schemes. It works with 70,000 merchants across Kenya, Tanzania, Rwanda, Uganda, Côte d'Ivoire, Senegal and Zambia. “Fast moving goods will become cheaper too with the new model”, says Yu.

No profit yet

The dynamic 29-year old entrepreneur, whose father is a medical doctor from Hongkong and his mother a pharmacist from California, developed his business model in a village in Sinai in Egypt while on a study trip: “The local trader never had anything and it was much too expensive.” His e-commerce scheme won a competition in Chicago; Kenyan based Unilever and others bought into his concept - and the university dropout never looked back. “We are still not making profit”, says Yu, who speaks eight languages including Mandarin and Arabic: “To built e-commerce in Africa requires long term commitment.” This echoes what Amazon founder Jeff Bezos once said: “We were an overnight success in ten years.”

Whatever it takes, holiday destination Zanzibar might just become for the continent what the famous Silicon Valley near San Francisco became for the world in the 1980’s - a door into a new age with vast changes for image, economy and education.

By Andrea Tapper

Beach Life in Fumba Town

First seaside restaurant opening – fun for the whole family

With quite some structural finesse the first seaside restaurant in Fumba Town is opening - complete with a sun deck, pizza oven, premium steaks and even sea access.

Enjoying sunsets only in Stone Town and Kendwa? Think twice. A long awaited new attraction in Fumba Town, a restaurant with a wooden deck on top of coral rocks directly overlooking the Indian Ocean, promises entertainment for the whole family – and golden Westcoast sunsets. Open from 5-11 pm, and on weekends from morning to night, kids are welcome to play beach volley ball here, grown-ups to enjoy a rooftop shisha lounge, a sun deck and even swimming access (depending on the tide). Fine casual outdoor dining in a friendly atmosphere is the focus of the new “KwetuKwetu Chill”. The location will be open to residents and visitors alike, with direct road access from Zanzibar City.

“For now it’s the first seaside restaurant in Fumba, but in ten years there will be a whole string of them all along the coast”, envisions Sebastian Dietzold, chief developer of Fumba Town, who has seen the peninsula develop from barren coral rock land to a sprawling suburb.

Finally a sea spot in Fumba

So far, the new seaside community Fumba Town, just 18 kilometres southwest of Zanzibar City, had been missing one important highlight – a beach. Some residents have taken to explore a natural lagoon and river towards within the vicinity, yet a proper ocean-side entertainment along the cliffy stretch of 1,5 kilometres shoreline had been lacking. All that has started to change with the construction of Kwetu Kwenu Chill (KKC). Metal poles drilled into the rocks are holding a deck with in-built hammocks in place; a wooden stairs leads more than three metres down to the sea. A shipping container was turned into a kitchen and bar.

Soft opening in coming weeks

“In the weeks to come we will have a soft opening”, announced Franko Goehse and Bernadette Kirsch, the proprietors of the restaurant, confident that “it will not only be a great addition for residents of Fumba Town but will attract visitors from all over the island.” The directors of the Permaculture Design Centre (PDC) are well-known personalities on the island and responsible for the green footprint of Fumba Town, setting new standards in urban landscaping in Zanzibar and beyond. In 2018 they opened the first and only Kwetu Kwenu Bistro in Fumba Town, a popular neighbourhood-hangout since its inception, 2019 a monthly farmer’s market of the same name. The new restaurant is the third enterprise in the Kwetu Kwenu family.

Everything locally sourced

Healthy, natural and local are keywords. The restaurant is designed in casual beach style with palette furniture by Ahmed design, dhow wood tables from Nungwi, eclectic sisal lamps from Katani. The food promises to be premium with a wood-fired pizza oven, “papy stove” barbecue grilling stations and a steak menu utilising “the best beef available in Tanzania”, as Franko Goehse puts it - prime steaks and dry-aged beef from “Let’s meat” in Dar es Salaam, already a favourite with upmarket clients on the mainland and exporting to Kuwait. Burgers, fresh seafood and chicken will compliment the menu, there will be seasonal salads and greens, sweet potatoes, cheli-cheli and plantain chips. “Will serve only the freshest local ingredients” the proprietors assure, vegetable, chicken and eggs from Msonge farm; fish from local Fumba fishermen; chutneys, honeys and more from Kwetu Kwenu farmer’s market.

“From Amsterdam, straight to Fumba”

With 14 suitcases the Van Bemmel family arrived in Fumba Town straight from the Netherlands, ready to start a new life.

Some homeowners buy for investment, others to rent out, you have come to stay?

Petra and Frank Van Bemmel: That’s right. We have no return ticket.

Why Zanzibar, why Fumba Town?

We stayed in Kenya for 3 years when we adopted our two children Darcy, 13, and Sifa, 10. And Frank wanted to live on a tropical island for a long time before he was turning 50. Now we have just made it!

You came with your companies? 

Petra: Yes, we are both independent. Frank runs an online advertising company. I write education curricula for primary schools. Our business fits in a suitcase. But our main reason to relocate were our children, we wanted them to grow up in an East African culture.

Are they happy here?

First we worried, if they would adjust. We specifically bought them a dog to have a companion. But on the very first day of our arrival in May they met a lot of age mates. Now it is us who are stranded with baby shepherd “Boef”.

Sifa: Every two weeks our parents ask us, if we want to stay or go.

And?

We like it here, we have found many new friends.

What does the whole family enjoy most?

European comfort in Africa, good Internet, attentive caretakers. And that the children can play outside all day long without fear. 

You occupy one of the prettiest units in Fumba, a 3-storey sea front house with a pool…

Every morning we try to swim 50 laps. We are only renting here, we bought a bungalow.  An advantage of Fumba Town is that there are many options.

What’s missing?

Frank: Maybe more shopping options. We tried online shopping and I ordered two pairs of jeans from Japan and believe it or not, a few weeks later the post office texted me in Swahili to pick them up. 

The Pavilion is now open!

The Pavilion commercial centre located in Zanzibar Fumba Town is now open for business.

The first commercial centre in Fumba Town, The Pavilion, was opened on Tuesday, 30th of August 2022.

Speaking on this, the CEO of CPS, Sebastian Dietzold, said, "The Pavilion will be the first commercial centre for the fast-growing community in Fumba Town. It will provide diverse services such as retail, offices, food and beverage, medical and sports facilities." .

CPS develops vibrant urban communities that add value for its investors in and outside Africa. The newly opened commercial centre is built to support its residents and community living around Fumba by providing high-quality services.

The town has a beautiful 1,5km seafront and is located only 15 minutes south of the Abeid Amani Karume International Airport.
Mr. Dietzold continued to say that the company has already completed hundreds of modern residential and commercial units and welcomes investors from around the globe to this stunning island full of opportunities.

Just Discovered – Blue Oyster Hotel In Jambiani

It’s not the label, which makes you green but the content. This certainly applies to the Blue Oyster Hotel, a family-run, popular hideout with 18 rooms in Jambiani. The hotel, opened in 1999, can pride itself of being the very first in Zanzibar to receive the “Responsible Tourism Tanzania Certification” (RTTZ) at the highest, so-called ‘tree level’. “We had to fulfil 272 criteria for that in an auditing process”, says Simon Beiser, who together with his brother Anwar runs the beach property founded by their father, the late Klaus Beiser.

Sorry, no pool

There is no pool and no air conditioning. Instead “we have the ocean on our doorstep, coastal winds and fans in the rooms”, says Anwar Beiser: “Responsible tourism has a high importance for our daily business.” A simple set-up of only four solar panels provides hot water for the entire hotel, while a natural basin filters grey water for gardening use. All waste is collected and recycled. Staff are encouraged to bring their trash from home to learn how to separate it. “It’s the simplicity of most ideas which strikes me most”, says manageress Louise Tinning, 29, who holds a bachelor degree in sustainable tourism. 

Staff from the neighbourhood

Other pillars of green success include fresh seasonal dishes. No endangered fish, but a local catch, fruits, veggies and meat from local farms. “Aware and well-trained staff”, says Tinning, is also very important. Many of the thirty or so staff members come from neighbouring villages, all are properly health insured and were kept on board even during the pandemic. 

Blue Oyster has started a foundation for schools and maternity support in the neighbourhood. Captain Zapi, a former fisherman, takes guests on popular sunset cruises in an ngalawa outrigger boat - one of the many examples of Zanzibari being integrated in the hotel. But the most special Blue Oyster green trick is the most simple: Everyday around 5 pm while guests are happily turning their sunbeds towards the gentle late-afternoon sun, a young waiter goes around to collect early dinner orders. Fresh coconut crusted fish today? Or better spinach stew with chapatis? “With early orders we avoid throwing away at least twenty portions per night”, explains Louise Tinning. So easy a conscious holiday can be! 

Ahhhh – fresh drinking water!

Together Greener – Bernadette Kirsch shares smart ideas for an eco-friendly lifestyle

Clay pots are the clue to clean water for your home.

How to make your own fresh water in Zanzibar at almost zero costs, explains our green expert Bernadette Kirsch, Fumba Town’s head of permaculture.

Water is an issue in many ways: pollution, environment, urban development and even government policies all get in the way of our prescribed dose of at least one litre fresh drinking water a day. Half of the Zanzibar population still has no access to piped fresh drinking water. 60 percent water loss occurs because of out-dated pipes. 

When Fumba Town was started in 2015, an independent water supply for the new town was established with the neighbouring villages Nyamanzi and Dimani also benefiting from it. Starting in September this year, Fumba Town will be additionally connected to the municipal lines of Zanzibar Water Authority (ZAWA) who will then have to conduct regular quality tests. Good news: The water price is expected to go down. All water in Zanzibar, whether private or public, comes from boreholes. 

Whatever the source, to be on the safe side, filtering drinking water with clay filters is a good idea for your home consumption - and a perfect way to replace buying bottled water. We all use far too much bottled water. Entire aisles at the grocery store are full of it. But while most people know that bottled water is not a good idea for many reasons (see box), we continue to purchase it anyway. 

Clay is clean!

The use of sand filtration can be traced back to the ancient Egyptians. In 1804, the first clay pot filters were used to purify the water supply in Paisley, Scotland. The ceramic water filtration system has been cited by the United Nations’ Appropriate Technology Handbook, and hundreds of thousands of filters have been distributed worldwide by organisations such as the Red Cross and Red Crescent, Doctors Without Borders and Oxfam .

For use in Zanzibar I recommend “Maji Salama'' fabricated by Safe Water Ceramics East Africa (SWCEA). We have used this system for more than five years at the Permaculture Design Company (PDC) and the Kwetu Kwenu kiosk in Fumba Town.

How do clay filters work?

SWCEA is a small family-run business in Arusha; their ceramic water filter has proven to remove 99% of all known pathogens, including those that cause cholera, dysentery, and stomach upsets. A combination of clay, sawdust and colloidal silver is used to form the initial shape of the hand-made pot. Colloidal silver is the key ingredient (also expensive) that kills the bacteria. The pot is burned at 900 degrees in a kiln for about 24 hours, followed by a cooling and drying process over several days. Regular tests, conducted at a local clinic, establish if the water flow is as expected (2-4  litres per hour) and bacteria-free. 

Using the clay filter at home

It is simple and easy to use. Each ceramic filter comes with a food grade plastic bucket with a cover and tap. It can filter four  litres per hour and 36 litres per day. A brush for scrubbing and cleaning the filter every three months and a cleaning instruction is included. The filters have a life span of five years.

A slight disadvantage is the slow process of filtering. I have made it a habit to let the filter run all the time and store the water in glass bottles in the fridge and outside. For the first two times that we ran the filter it had a clayey taste. Thereafter, it tasted fresh, as charcoal produced from the burned sawdust restored natural water taste. To pep up the taste, I often add a slice of lemon, mint or lemongrass. 

Let’s go outside!

Latest trends in outdoor furniture - also made in Tanzania

Smarten up your outdoor space – the latest furniture and deco ideas here. The new darling is dining al fresco.

Dining, lounging, sun bathing: creating a beach & country feeling on your terrace, in the backyard or your garden not only adds space but a renewed appreciation of nature to your life. In Zanzibar’s tropical climate, outdoor living is a given - even if perpetually challenged by heat, mosquitoes and other creepy creatures. “There’s nothing better than a sunset on your own terrace in Tanzania and even more so in Zanzibar”, knows Elmarie van Heerden, founder and owner of The Greem Room furniture company in Dar es Salaam. Even in post-Covid Europe “climate change has turned balconies into living rooms, too”, says Marianne Clichy, an interior designer from Paris. Here some fresh looks for 2022, from close to home and abroad.

#1 Dining al fresco

In previous years outdoor sofas brought the living room out in the open, in 2022 everybody’s darling is the outdoor dining room which invites you to socialise in fresh air. Weatherproof, elegant tables and upholstered armchairs steal the show from indoor tables. A beautiful African alternative are foldable safari chairs – just add extra pillows and consider a repaint. ”If space is limited, an outdoor sofa with side tables can double up as an eating and entertaining space”, suggests Elmarie von Heerden. ”Some clients love to eat al fresco year round in our warm climate.”

#2 Comeback of the sunbed

Is sunbathing still popular in 2022? Apparently yes. “It could be the longing for the familiar and loved ones that makes us relax on classic sun loungers in these turbulent times”, says designer Clichy. Many new sunbeds in natural or high-tech fabrics are on the market, but prices for quality brands are steep. A simple Zanzibar string bed topped with a foam layer in a washable white or dark blue plastic cover and fluffy white pillows is an alternative – but has to be kept superclean at all times, not to look tired. The same goes for a traditional carved bed either with mosquito netting or white linen curtains to substitute a chaise longue.

#3 Outdoor cocktail 

Show your creativity by mixing materials; aluminium is hot and does not rust. Compliment bamboo chairs with a metal bench and a solid stone table – very much the “in”-thing. Think baraza! “Locally grown teak is our favourite for pieces to stand the test of time and weather”, says van Heerden. When it comes to “outdoor software “soft cushions and covers with UV resistant fabrics together with woven deep seating are the most popular”, the designer knows. All Green Room furniture is handmade in Dar es Salaam and can be customised to fit any space.

#4 Jiko deluxe

The trend towards outdoor dining poses a whole new challenge for storage space. In Fumba’s Horizon duplexes, for example, an outdoor kitchen is part of the deal, complete with a sink and a counter to place an induction cooker. A stylish sideboard and a fire bowl are must-haves for your 2022 terrace.

By Andrea Tapper